Please download and read the IBO teachers manual called “Making the PYP happen” – A curriculum framework for international primary education (A PYP Teacher’s Manual) Copyright International Baccalaureate Organization 2007

MVSD school board member Laura Vincent stated to parents, teachers, community members and State Reps that MVSD would NOT be following “mission” of the IBO, or using their materials. And yet, this is what we saw being used in the MVSD elementary classrooms; in keeping with what the IBO requires of teachers when they say they must ‘profile’ learners for their values using the IBOs framework:

International-mindedness: the PYP perspective
“In the PYP, the attempt to define international-mindedness in increasingly clear terms, and the struggle to move closer to that ideal in practice, are central to the mission of PYP schools. The learner profile is central to the PYP definition of what it means to be internationally minded, and it directs schools to focus on the learning.” [Page 2]

“The IBO is conscious that this learner profile is value-laden and, it would say, quite rightly so, for this kind of learning is what the IBO supports, and it is the embodiment of what the IBO believes about international education.” [Page 3]

So the central mission is not reading, not math, not science, but a values clarification test of who is, and who is not progressing toward ‘international-mindedness’…

It goes on to say that…

“A PYP school needs to ensure that its mission statement is in line with that of the IBO and that, together with the learner profile, it adds vitality to the life of the school community and has a particular impact on teaching and learning.” [Page 5]

Further it states: “As well as presenting schools with a philosophical perspective on what international education may be, the PYP prescribes a curriculum framework of essential elements—knowledge, concepts, skills, attitudes, and action — each of which is reflected in the learner profile and is a reference point for the construction of a school’s curriculum. How these essential elements help to frame the school’s curriculum is explored later in this document.” [Page 5]

So it directs the teachers to frame all learning within the IB learner profile that defines the IBO’s idea of international-mindedness, further described as the ‘driving force’ of PYP.

Still don’t think it’s political?

“On examining the student profile and the factors of internationalism, the reader may be tempted to point out that these elements would be desirable in national schools and in international schools. Internationalism in education is, thankfully, not the sole property of international schools. It is an ideal towards which all schools should strive but one which carries a greater imperative for PYP schools.” [Page 6]

Finally it states that “In a PYP school, all constituents are committed to learning and to developing international-mindedness.” [Page 41]

What if the “constituents”, those parents and residents who pay the TAXES for these schools, the teachers, or the community at large do NOT agree with the goal of internationalism? What then?

From the IBO PYP file “Basis for Practice” we glean the endgame of IB’s educational plan:

“As well as presenting schools with a philosophical perspective on what international education may be, the PYP prescribes a curriculum framework of essential elements:
- knowledge
- concepts
- skills
- attitudes
- action

“Attitudes and action” are key to the concept of international-mindedness… as the attitudes come from the UN and the actions they wish the students to take are those of the UN’s political bias with regard to their pet projects.

Further we find…

The PYP enables students to develop an insight into the experiences of others, through:

- the knowledge component of the curriculum
- the IB learner profile and the attitudes that support it
- the students’ own conceptual development
- the expectation that they will engage in socially responsible action as a result of the learning experience.

Once again, we find “the expectation that they will engage in socially responsible action as a result of the learning experience” is clear evidence that activism is the goal.

Of course every teacher expects their students to be socially responsible, especially for the time they spend in the school environment and hopefully beyond — basically people expect and understand and accept that teachers will try to reinforce basic universal values such as working hard, respecting others and their property, etc., values that are a-political. But this goes beyond such issues as exemplified in the types of actions students are encouraged to take, about issues which they cannot possibly yet fully understand as pre-adolescents or adolescents.